Please call (858) 255-8085/ email info@gemslajolla.com to schedule your appointment.
Please call (858) 255-8085/ email info@gemslajolla.com to schedule your appointment.
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La Jolla Jewelry Appraiser Blog

La Jolla Jewelry Appraiser Won The 2022 ASA Rising Star Award

La Jolla Jewelry Appraiser Won The 2022 ASA Rising Star Award

Jewelry appraiser Trang Pham, GIA Graduate Gemologist, owner of La Jolla Gem Appraisal won the 2022 Rising Star Award from the prestigious American Society of Appraisers (ASA).  This is another step in proving her commitment with the profession she is passionate with.  The Rising Stars Award program is aimed at engaging up-and-coming appraisal professionals by honoring young leaders who have demonstrated significant contributions and successes throughout the year within the valuation profession.  Rising Stars honorees are nominated and selected by the Rising Stars Committee based on their professional achievements in the workplace and their volunteer efforts at the local, national or international levels....

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Jewelry Appraisal's Case Study: Is It A Fancy Light Yellow Diamond Or Something Else?

Jewelry Appraisal's Case Study: Is It A Fancy Light Yellow Diamond Or Something Else?

In most cases, there is NO NEED to remove the diamonds from their settings when appraising jewelry.  However, when the setting affects the grading of the diamond, such as this 5 carat cut-cornered rectangular modified brilliant cut diamond ring with an 18k yellow gold setting which purposely makes it look like a fancy light yellow diamond, the most accurate way to grade it is to remove the diamond from its some-what confusing setting.  (The rest of the setting is in 14K white gold and G-H mellee diamonds).  The truth has revealed that it’s an L near-colorless diamond. This setting has...

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La Jolla Gem Appraisal applies advanced technology to identify natural versus synthetic diamond

La Jolla Gem Appraisal applies advanced technology to identify natural versus synthetic diamond

In the trade, it is essential that laboratory-grown diamonds can be identified because consumers need to know what they are buying, and because there are often significant price differences between them and natural gemstones.  It is increasingly important for gemologist appraisers to make that call of diamond origin (natural or synthetic) when appraising jewelry to produce credible reports for their clients.  Because laboratory-grown diamonds are essentially chemically and optically the same as their natural counterparts, traditional gemological observations and old-style “diamond detectors” are not able to tell them apart.  Identification at a professional gemological laboratory or using sophisticated devices developed...

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Fracture-filling in diamonds: a treatment to enhance diamond clarity but it needs to be disclosed to the consumers

Fracture-filling in diamonds: a treatment to enhance diamond clarity but it needs to be disclosed to the consumers

What is fracture-filled diamond? There are many diamonds (both loose and mounted stones) that come across my desk on a daily basis for inspection as a part of the appraisal process.  One of them is this diamond.  It is an otherwise I3 in clarity before treatment (I3 is the lowest clarity grade in the GIA diamond grading system that I3 diamonds are highly included by fractures, crystals and other types of inclusions).  By the time I graded this diamond under 10x magnification, it is considered by myself as I2.  What did they do to this diamond to enhance its clarity? ...

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How To Date Diamonds?

How To Date Diamonds?

Diamond in kimberlite.  Photo courtesy of Geology For Investors Scientists estimate that the earth is about 4.6 billion years old.  According to GIA, research published in 2010 indicates that the youngest known diamonds—found in a Brazilian kimberlite—are just 107 million years old.  On the other hand, the oldest known diamonds—from Canada’s Ekati mine—are as much as 3.5 billion years old.   Scientists measure the age of a rock with a process called radiometric dating. The minerals in a rock might contain radioactive elements. If they do, those elements give off atomic particles as they decay. As a radioactive element emits...

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